Helpful Hints

Forming a Water Seal

Best results are obtained when the cookware is filled to at least two-thirds capacity with the food you are preparing. It is also important to use the proper size cookware for the amount of food. Always use the cover designed to fit each specific piece of cookware. Add liquid only as stated in your Lifetime instructions or recipe. If you use too high of heat or too much food/liquid in your pan sputtering may occur. Always remember to begin on medium heat, and then reduce to low!

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Retaining Low Heat

Sometimes the setting on the range may be still too hot to obtain the proper water seal. You may need to use a flame tamer under the cookware when cooking. You can purchase a flame tamer at your local hardware store or large discount store.

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Removing Covers that Seem to be “locked on” to the Cookware

After cooking, the cookware may have a snug water seal which will lock the cover on to the cookware and make it difficult to remove. Just reheat the cookware on low heat until the cover loosens enough to remove with ease.

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Keeping the Exterior of your Cookware Clean

If cookware pieces are one of the last items you wash, the water can leave sediments on your cookware which, over time, burn onto the cookware. To remove rinse your cookware in warm water and sprinkle a small amount of non-abrasive cleanser to make a paste-like mixture. Using a damp soft cloth or sponge rub in a circular motion around the cookware exterior. Rinse well in hot soapy water to remove all cleanser and dry with clean towel. Never use an abrasive cleaner on the outside finish.

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Removing Stuck or Burnt on Food

Sticking is usually caused from cooking on heat that is too high or from improper cleaning. Lifetime cookware is designed to cook on lower temperature settings and high heat is not required. High heat will cause moisture to be driven out of the utensil. This will prevent the water seal from forming, and will result in food shrinkage, sticking and burning of the food. (Electric range owners please keep in mind that burners retain heat longer; therefore, it may be necessary to remove the utensil until vapor subsides.). Higher heat should be used only when necessary, such as boiling liquid.

In the event of burned-on or dried- on foods, let the cookware cool completely, then fill part way with cool water and bring to a boil over medium heat. When food particles loosen, allow pan to cool and clean as recommended.

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When Accumulation of Grease Occurs

Dirt or grease residue left on stove burners can burn onto the bottom of your cookware. Placing cookware pieces inside one another after use but before cleaning will cause food particles or grease to collect on the inside or on the outside bottom of the cookware.

Simply rinse the utensil with warm tap water and drain excess water, leaving only a few drops. Sprinkle a small amount of non-abrasive cleanser inside your cookware to make a paste-like mixture. Using a dry paper towel, rub in a circular motion. Rinse well in hot soapy water to remove all cleanser and dry with a clean towel.

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Preventing Water Spots

Varying water conditions can cause spotting. Additionally, high iron content in water may even cause the cookware to take on a rust appearance.

Remove detachable long handles. Use warm soapy water with a sponge, dishcloth, and nylon net or plastic pad. Rinse thoroughly with clear warm water and dry immediately to avoid water spots. Do not use harsh souring powders, or a cleaner that contains chlorine bleach as they will harm the stainless steel. Note: If you use a dishwasher, add a rinse agent.

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Dealing with Gold or Blue Discolorations

It is possible that one of your pieces of cookware will turn gold or blue on the bottom, or even on the inside. Don't panic. This change in appearance means only that high heat has been used for an excessive amount of time. You can scorch anything, even Lifetime® cookware, simply by using high heat. Remember, you haven't hurt the cookware. It is still sanitary and will cook efficiently and safely. Keep in mind; it is never necessary to set your burner to the highest heat, even when boiling water.

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Preventing White Film on Your Cookware

Sometimes a slight residue may remain on the cookware after cooking and cleaning. Usually this will appear as a white film. This is, primarily, sodium cooked out of foods and calcium deposits that the dishwasher may not remove. This is easily removed by using a mild non-abrasive cleanser. Simply rinse the utensil with warm tap water and drain excess water, leaving only a few drops. Sprinkle a small amount of non-abrasive cleanser to make a paste-like mixture. Using a dry paper towel, rub in a circular motion. Rinse well in hot soapy water to remove all cleanser and dry with a clean towel.

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When Scratches Happen

You may use anything on the inside bottom of your cookware, even a mixer. You will scratch it, but you will not hurt the cooking ability of the cookware. Lifetime® is made to be used, not pampered.

To keep the cookware attractive on the outside (because that is what people will notice) never use an abrasive on the outside finish. If food particles remain on the inside of the cookware, simply rinse the utensil with warm tap water and drain excess water, leaving only a few drops. Sprinkle a small amount of non-abrasive cleanser to make a paste-like mixture. Using a dry paper towel, rub in a circular motion. Rinse well in hot soapy water to remove all cleanser and dry with a clean towel.

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Preventing White Spots on the Interior of the Cookware

Undissolved salt and/or acidic foods left sitting in your cookware can cause white spots, referred to as “pitting”. This will not affect the cooking performance of the cookware and is not considered a product failure. Salts should be added to the food after the cooking temperature has been reached. When boiling water, add salt after the water has reached its boiling point and keep stirring until the salt has dissolved.

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Using the Dishwasher to Clean Lifetime Cookware

Removing the detachable long handles will allow extra room in the dishwasher. To prevent scratching of cookware, carefully place the cookware onto the dishwasher rack so it does not touch other objects/dishes. Use a chlorine-free detergent with a rinse agent to help prevent spotting. Please note that handles may become discolored from dishwasher detergents. The dishwasher will not remove heat or food stains. Use a non-abrasive cleanser for stain removal. We recommend hand-washing for best results.

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Dulling of Handles or Knobs

This occurs when the cookware is used at a very high heat. The use of certain cleansers can also cause the finish to dull. Always begin cooking over medium heat, and then reduce to low for the remainder of the cooking period. Also, make sure you are using a chlorine-free detergent when cleaning your cookware.

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Using Your Lifetime Cookware in the Oven

Your cookware can be used in the oven at temperatures up to 350°F/177°C. It is recommended that you remove the detachable long handles. If you put your cookware in an oven that exceeds these temperatures or use your cookware in the oven when the broiler unit is on, you will damage your handles and knobs. Before placing your cookware in the oven, be sure the oven is preheated to the desired temperature and place the oven rack on the lowest possible position to provide even heat circulation. Do not place cookware in the oven while it is preheating or under the broiler.

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Frying an Egg in Your Lifetime Cookware

When you fry eggs it is very important to preheat your skillet on medium to low. If you wish to avoid oil, you can preheat a skillet for several minutes, add two tablespoons of water and immediately add your eggs. Sprinkle the tops of the eggs with the seasoning of your choice and cover. Reduce heat to low and cook until done to taste. It will take approximately 2 minutes for an egg that is firmly set with a soft yolk, 6 minutes for the yolk to be firm.

Eggs can also be cooked traditionally by preheating the skillet over medium heat for 1 minute and then adding 1 tablespoon butter or oil. When butter begins to bubble, lift skillet and swirl to coat cooking surface. Return pan to medium heat. When butter bubbles again, slide eggs into skillet. Cook until white of egg is no longer translucent or runny, 2 to 3 minutes. If desired, using a spatula, turn over and cook an additional 1 minute.

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Purchasing Lifetime Cookware Replacement Parts

See our Replacement Parts page for more information.

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Lifetime® Cookware, Solar Cap®, Familie® and LiquidCore® are registered trademarks of Regal Ware, Inc.
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